Gail

Take That Chance

In general on June 5, 2012 at 5:21 pm

Here is another excerpt from my autobiography, Another Day Without A Cage: My Breakthrough From Self-Imprisonment To Total Empowerment on taking a chance and reaching for your goals. Enjoy!

Ever since I was a little girl, I dreamed of being on television. So when I had the chance to speak with representatives of a television show, I jumped at the opportunity. Initially my goal was to convince them to hire me as a speaker for their organization. But as I listened to their plans and needs, I learned that they were looking for new on-air hosts.

Without thinking twice, I took the chance and blurted out, “What about me?”

As the words left my mouth, they almost sounded ridiculous. I had never spoken in front of a television camera. I had no idea how a television studio was managed. Regardless of my lack of experience, though, I had to speak up, and I’m glad I did.

I didn’t get the job right away. It took persistence, energy and hard work to land my first job as host of a TV show several months later, but taking a chance and saying those three magic words, what about me, made all the difference. My advice to you is this: don’t be afraid to take that chance. What have you got to lose? Not much. But you have so much to gain. 

To find out more about Another Day Without A Cage: My Breakthrough From Self-Imprisonment To Total Empowerment, click here – http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/another-day-without-a-cage-gail-kasper/1104702945?ean=9781614480891

Gail Kasper, Author

Unstoppable: 6 Easy Steps To Achieve Your Goals
Another Day Without A Cage: My Breakthrough

Overcome The “Not Invented Here” Syndrome – Part 2

In general on June 4, 2012 at 5:22 pm

Welcome back! I hope you all had a wonderful weekend.

As promised, I’ve included my final 2 tips on how to overcome NIH syndrome.

To find more articles filled with helpful tips to assist in any aspect of life, visit the Top 1 Percent Club (www.top1percentclub.com) and meet our experts!

2.     Leave your ego at the door. Just because you didn’t come up with the idea doesn’t mean it has no value. Put your ego aside and determine the concept’s value logically, without letting your emotions get in the way.

3.     Keep an open mind. People tend to resist what’s unfamiliar, yet we often benefit when we’re open to trying something different. By keeping an open mind, you’ll be more likely to see the benefits of trying something that was “Not Invented Here.”
 

Gail Kasper, Author

Unstoppable: 6 Easy Steps To Achieve Your Goals
Another Day Without A Cage: My Breakthrough

Overcome The “Not Invented Here” Syndrome

In general on June 1, 2012 at 5:35 pm

Are you familiar with NIH, the “not invented here” syndrome? Perhaps it’s rampant at your place of work. In essence, it’s a persistent culture of avoiding new technology, services, ideas, systems or methods unless they come from within. It’s a form of mistrust and even elitism. Unless you or your particular group developed it, you and your group want no part of it.

In case you weren’t aware, the evolution of my life and in my training to others, was because of the opposite. I firmly preach that you must see outside information, whether you are a company or a person. In my autobiography, Another Day Without A Cage: My Breakthrough From Self-Imprisonment To Total Empowerment, I take my life from helplessness to total empowerment because I seek outside input and stretch myself to uncover the unknown, despite fear.

Unfortunately, this ‘not invented here’ attitude exists and can lead to much inefficiency at work. I mean, why re-invent the wheel when it already exists and works just fine? Avoiding a concept or tool or procedure just because it “wasn’t invented here” stems from all the wrong ideas, from being suspicious of outside influences to being unwilling to value the work of others. It leads to an uncooperative, wasteful and even disorganized working environment – certainly not conducive for getting things done.

Here’s how to overcome this crippling mentality:

1.     Evaluate the product, system, tool or idea on its own merit, regardless of where it came from or who developed it. If it’s useful to you or your department, if it saves time, money or resources, if it’s brilliant, then put aside your concerns and use it.

2.    Determine how it will make your job easier or make you perform better. Does this method or technology help you do your job better? Does it benefit you? Can it potentially help you produce better work in less time? If the answer to any of these is “yes,” then apply the product or service even if it comes from an external group. 

Check back on Monday for the last 2 tips to over the NIH syndrome! Have a great weekend! 

Gail Kasper, Author

Unstoppable: 6 Easy Steps To Achieve Your Goals
Another Day Without A Cage: My Breakthrough